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Research Opportunities

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Prospective Students

The goal of the NIH Oxford-Cambridge (OxCam) Scholars Program is to create, foster, and advance unique and collaborative research opportunities between NIH laboratories and laboratories at the University of Oxford or the University of Cambridge. Each OxCam Scholar develops a collaborative research project that will constitute his/her doctoral training. Each Scholar also select two mentors – one at the NIH and one in the UK – who work together to guide the Scholar throughout the research endeavor.

Students may select from two categories of projects: Self-designed or Prearranged. OxCam Scholars may create a self-designed project, which enables students to develop a collaborative project tailored to his/her specific scientific interests by selecting one NIH mentor and one UK mentor with expertise in the desired research area(s). Alternatively, students may select a prearranged project provided by NIH and/or UK Investigator(s) willing to mentor an OxCam Scholar in their lab.

Self-designed Projects: Students may create a novel (or de novo) project based on their unique research interests. Students have the freedom to contact any PI at NIH or at Oxford or Cambridge to build a collaboration from scratch. The NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) represents a community of approximately 1,200 tenured and tenure-track investigators providing a wealth of opportunity to explore a wide variety of research interests. Students may visit https://irp.nih.gov to identify NIH PIs performing research in the area of interest. For additional tips on choosing a mentor, please visit our Training Plan.

Prearranged Projects: Investigators at NIH or at Oxford or Cambridge have voluntarily offered collaborative project ideas for NIH OxCam Scholars. These projects are provided below and categorized by research area, NIH Institute/Center, and University. In some cases, a full collaboration with two mentors is already in place. In other instances, only one PI is identified, which allows the student to select a second mentor to complete the collaboration. Please note that prearranged project offerings are continuously updated throughout the year and are subject to change.

3 Search Results

318
Category:
Developmental Biology
Project:

Understanding the self-organization of morphogenesis and collective cell migration in the zebrafish embryo

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
NIH Mentor:

Dr. Ajay Chitnis 

University:
Cambridge
Project Details:

The posterior Lateral Line primordium is a group of about a hundred cells that migrates under the skin, from the ear to the tip of the tail, periodically forming and depositing sensory organs called neuromasts, to spearhead formation of the zebrafish Lateral Line sensory system. In recent years, this relatively simple and accessible system has emerged as an attractive model for understanding various aspects of morphogenesis in the developing embryo, including the guidance of cell migration, tissue patterning and organ formation. The goal is to use a combination of cellular, molecular, genetic and biomechanical manipulations coupled with live imaging, image processing and the development of multi-scale computational models to understand the self-organization of cell-fate, morphogenesis and migration of the lateral line primordium. Specific focus will be on developing tools and methods for investigating, imaging, quantifying and modelling the mechanics of collective migration, morphogenesis of epithelial rosettes and the intercellular and intracellular signaling networks that coordinate lateral line primordium development.

208
Category:
Developmental Biology
Project:

Effects of obesity on maternal metabolism and fetal growth

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
N/A
NIH Mentor:
N/A
University:
Cambridge
Project Details:

Obesity during pregnancy affects maternal and infant health both during pregnancy and for long afterwards. It raises the risk of health complications like maternal diabetes during pregnancy, and increases the susceptibility of the mother to develop metabolic syndrome in the years after delivery. It also leads to neonatal and later life health complications in their infants, such that infants are more prone to develop metabolic impairments themselves in later life. Despite this, the mechanisms operating during pregnancy that lead to these poor pregnancy outcomes in obese women, remain unknown. The placenta is the organ that produces hormones responsible for changing the metabolism of the mother to ensure sufficient nutrients are available for fetal growth during pregnancy. However, to date, little is known about the role of placental hormone production in the development of maternal metabolic complications in pregnancies where the mother is obese. This study aims to identify the importance of placental hormone production for maternal metabolism and fetal growth in pregnancies where the mother is obese. It will use samples from pregnant mice that are lean or obese (due to a diet high in sugar and fat) and omic approaches (RNAseq/mass spec) on fluorescence-activated sorted placental endocrine cells to identify the hormones disrupted by maternal obesity with metabolic effects. It will also use metabolic, molecular, mitochondrial and biochemical assays to assess the mother’s ability to use glucose and respond to insulin in obese mice with and without a genetic defect in the placenta that disrupts placental hormone production. Finally, hormones identified to be importance in maternal metabolic regulation in mouse pregnancies will be quantified in the plasma of lean and obese women to determine if they relate to pregnancy outcome.

135
Category:
Developmental Biology
Project:

Organogenesis of the Zebrafish Vasculature.

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
NIH Mentor:

Dr. Brant Weinstein

UK Mentor:
N/A
University:
N/A
Project Details:
N/A
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