header-bg

Research Opportunities

Background Header
Image
Prospective Students

The goal of the NIH Oxford-Cambridge (OxCam) Scholars Program is to create, foster, and advance unique and collaborative research opportunities between NIH laboratories and laboratories at the University of Oxford or the University of Cambridge. Each OxCam Scholar develops a collaborative research project that will constitute his/her doctoral training. Each Scholar also select two mentors – one at the NIH and one in the UK – who work together to guide the Scholar throughout the research endeavor.

Students may select from two categories of projects: Self-designed or Prearranged. OxCam Scholars may create a self-designed project, which enables students to develop a collaborative project tailored to his/her specific scientific interests by selecting one NIH mentor and one UK mentor with expertise in the desired research area(s). Alternatively, students may select a prearranged project provided by NIH and/or UK Investigator(s) willing to mentor an OxCam Scholar in their lab.

Self-designed Projects: Students may create a novel (or de novo) project based on their unique research interests. Students have the freedom to contact any PI at NIH or at Oxford or Cambridge to build a collaboration from scratch. The NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) represents a community of approximately 1,200 tenured and tenure-track investigators providing a wealth of opportunity to explore a wide variety of research interests. Students may visit https://irp.nih.gov to identify NIH PIs performing research in the area of interest. For additional tips on choosing a mentor, please visit our Training Plan.

Prearranged Projects: Investigators at NIH or at Oxford or Cambridge have voluntarily offered collaborative project ideas for NIH OxCam Scholars. These projects are provided below and categorized by research area, NIH Institute/Center, and University. In some cases, a full collaboration with two mentors is already in place. In other instances, only one PI is identified, which allows the student to select a second mentor to complete the collaboration. Please note that prearranged project offerings are continuously updated throughout the year and are subject to change.

7 Search Results

247
Category:
Biomedical Engineering & Biophysics
Project:

Ultra-High Field (7T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Development

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
N/A
NIH Mentor:
N/A
UK Mentor:

Prof. Chris Rodgers

University:
Cambridge
Project Details:

I founded a new ultra-high field (7T) MRI physics group in Cambridge in autumn 2017. We develop cutting-edge methods for studying the human brain and body using Cambridge’s state-of-the-art Siemens Terra 7T MRI scanner. My group have active collaborations with clinicians in clinical neurosciences, psychiatry, oncology, and cardiology (Papworth), and with experts in cognitive neuroscience. I welcome PhD students to join the group. The following are areas of strong interest from our community, which would be suitable to develop a PhD project in discussion with me.


(i) Developing new spectroscopic imaging pulse sequences to map neurochemical profiles across the whole brain in a single scan. We have hardware available to apply these methods to study metabolites containing 1H (e.g. NAA, creatine, GABA, GSH) or 31P (e.g. PCr, ATP, in vivo pH mapping) or 13C (e.g. labelled glucose or succinate).
(ii) Developing new methods for neuroimaging, particularly for imaging blood flow in small vessel disease, or for rapid, motion-corrected fMRI in deep brain nuclei.
(iii) Developing new metabolic imaging methods for use in the human body. These would use a new multinuclear (1H and 31P) whole-body coil being built for me by Tesla Dynamic Coils (Netherlands). This could be developed in collaboration with colleagues at Papworth and Radiology for studies in the heart.
(iv) Imaging of metabolism by 2H deuterium metabolic imaging (DMI). 

 

240
Category:
Biomedical Engineering & Biophysics
Project:

Using an “organ on chip” model of the cochlea for rapid drug assay, and to test new generations of cochlear implants

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
N/A
NIH Mentor:
N/A
UK Mentor:

Prof. Manohar Bance

University:
N/A
Project Details:

We have an interdisciplinary program with biomaterials, clinicians, surgeons, electrical engineers and chemical engineers to 3D fabricate cochleas with microanatomy similar to living cochleas, embedded with sensors that can sense current spread from cochlear implants, or ion gradients from various inner ear cell types that can generate them. Our goal is to develop these types of constructs, seed them with 3D cultures of various  inner ear cell types and examine how cochlear implants can activate auditory neurones, or how regeneration or pharmacologic support for hearing loss can be developed.  his is in order to develop the next generation of inner ear hearing loss therapies.

230
Category:
Biomedical Engineering & Biophysics
Project:

Develop Implantable BIOsensors for the detection of small METAbolites in the inflamed brain

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
N/A
NIH Mentor:
N/A
University:
Cambridge
Project Details:

The project aims to develop and exploit high transconductance organic electrochemical transistor-based bio-sensors and ultra-low power thin-film electronics as emerging ICT tools with perfect fit to the targeted application domain. The proposed sensors and interfaces will provide unprecedented ability to detect and monitor small metabolites both in vitro and in vivo, to map immunometabolism of organs and tissues, and to test new drugs in situ.

222
Category:
Biomedical Engineering & Biophysics
Project:

Invent and implement new radioactive probes for imaging specific molecular targets 

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
NIH Mentor:

Dr. Victor Pike

University:
Cambridge
Project Details:

Invent and implement new radioactive probes for imaging specific molecular targets in animal and human brain with positron emission tomography

195
Category:
Biomedical Engineering & Biophysics
Project:

Invent and implement new radioactive probes for imaging specific molecular targets

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
NIH Mentor:

Dr. Victor Pike

University:
Oxford
Project Details:

Invent and implement new radioactive probes for imaging specific molecular targets in animal and human brain with positron emission tomography

175
Category:
Biomedical Engineering & Biophysics
Project:

Identifying mechanisms by which endothelial cells sense and respond to blood flow

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
N/A
NIH Mentor:
N/A
UK Mentor:

Prof. Ellie Tzima

University:
Oxford
Project Details:

Forces are important in the cardiovascular system, acting as regulators of vascular physiology and pathology. Vascular endothelial cells are constantly exposed to mechanical forces, such as shear stress, due to the flowing blood. Patterns of blood flow depend on blood vessel geometry and type and can range from uniform blood flow (which is protective) to disturbed blood flow (which is pathologic). Although we know that endothelial cells can sense and respond differently to different types of flow, the mechanisms by which they sense and respond to blood flow remain a mystery. Our laboratory has pioneered the studies of endothelial mechano-sensing and has championed the use of a multi-disciplinary approach to this scientific problem. The focus of the proposed studentship is to identify mechanisms by which endothelial cells sense and respond to blood flow.  The student will have the opportunity to be exposed to a wide range of techniques based on the student’s individual interests that include: i) use of imaging and genetic approaches to characterize how mechano-sensing affects disease initiation and progression ; (2) applying high throughput RNA sequencing and proteomics approaches to globally dissect steps involved in disease etiology; 3) use of bioinformatics and biochemical experimental approaches to understand the role of blood flow forces in cardiovascular disease.

170
Category:
Biomedical Engineering & Biophysics
Project:

Ion Channel Gating and Biophysics

Project Listed Date:
Institute or Center:
N/A
NIH Mentor:
N/A
University:
Oxford
Project Details:

We have been studying the mechanism of gating in the Two-Pore Domain (K2P) family of K+ channels and the way in which their gating can be regulated by lipids and small molecules.  It is now clear these channels use a variety of structural mechanisms to open and close their pores, including changes within the selectivity filter itself.  This mechanism of filter gating is also known to occur in other members of this superfamily of tetrameric cation channels including the BK Calcium-activated K+ channel and Cyclic Nucleotide Gated (CNG) channels.  In the proposed project the student would have the opportunity to combine multiple different biophysical, computational, and functional approaches to investigate the structural mechanisms of filter gating in these channels and investigate what properties might be common amongst these channels.

Back to Top