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Prospective Students

 

PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS

 

Collaboration Opportunities

 

Collaboration Opportunities

The NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) represents a community of approximately 1,200 tenured and tenure-track investigators. NIH investigators in over 17 institutes at the NIH have welcomed NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars into their labs.

One of the key elements of the NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program (OxCam) is collaboration. It is important that our students be able to find mentors at both the NIH and The Universities of Oxford or Cambridge.  This page is dedicated to assisting our students with this process by posting project opportunities from potential mentors. (For tips on choosing a mentor, please visit our Training Plan)

There are often times that an investigator will be working on, or planning, a project and would value the addition of a PhD student to his/her lab.  These investigators could also benefit from the international collaborative opportunities and interdisciplinary techniques that are available by having an NIH OxCam scholar on their team.

This site will assist with many facets of the mentor and project defining process:

  • Potential mentors can advertise for students
  • Students can “shop” for mentors and projects
  • Mentors and students can “shop” for potential collaborators

This page is a perpetual work-in-progress; projects end, budgets change, and positions are filled, but we want this to be a starting point for inspiration and ideas.

National Cancer Institute
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences
National Eye Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

National Human Genome Research Institute
National Institute on Aging
National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Institute of Mental Health
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Oxford
Cambridge

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

NIH mentor: Dr. Christian Abnet (NCI/DCEG)
UK mentor:
Prof. Rebecca Fitzgerald
University:
Cambridge, MRC Cancer Unit
Project:
Genetics of squamous cell carcinoma - identifying high risk groups

NIH mentor: Dr. Genoveffa (Veffa) Franchini (NCI/CCR)
UK mentor:
Prof. Jonathan L Heeney
University:
Cambridge, Department of Veterinary Medicine
Project:
Proposed projects; We have several lines of research that accommodate excellent PhD candidates. These revolve around the theme of RNA viral pathogens, antibodies/B-cell responses and immunodefifiencies.The 1st involves understanding Immune Correlates of protective immunity, specifically which types of B-cell response and their fine specificities are important for protection against specific RNA viral pathogens (RNA viruses from HIV, HCV to Ebola) how B-cell responses to correlate with protection by vaccines to specific pathogens. The 2nd project involves using broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to develop improved and novel vaccines against notoriously variable viruses. The 3rd project involves understanding how the resident virome in primary, acquired or induced immunodeficies leads to chronic immune activation and poor prognosis, with an emphasis on mucosal immunity.

NIH mentor: Dr. Amy Berrington de Gonzalez (NCI)
UK mentor: Prof. Jane Green
University: Oxford
Project: Diet and brain tumors in the UK million women study and the US NIH-AARP diet and health study.

NIH mentor: Dr. Eric Freed (NCI)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Elucidate basic mechanisms of HIV replication at the molecular level, with an emphasis on the late states of the virus replication cycle.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Montserrat Garcia-Closas (NCI)
UK Mentor: Prof. Paul Pharoah
University: Cambridge, Department of Oncology and Public Health and Primary Care
Project: Molecular and somatic genetic profiling of breast tumors in relation to etiology and survival in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)

NIH mentor: Dr. Ludmila Prokunina-Olsson (NCI)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Genetic and functional association of a novel human interferon, IFN-λ4, with human infections and cancer.

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

NIH mentor: Dr. Lauren Atlas (NCATS)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Characterizing the psychological and neural mechanisms by which expectations and other cognitive and affective factors influence pain, emotional experience, and clinical outcomes.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Rajarshi Guha (NCATS)
UK Mentor: Dr. Andreas Bender
University: Cambridge, Department of Chemistry, Molecular Informatics Centre
Project: Predicting the Efficacy of Drug Combination Therapy in Cancer and Malaria

Given the difficulty of finding novel and efficacious single compound treatments the combination of existing drugs is currently seen as a viable alternative strategy; however, due to combinatorial explosion predictive modeling methods of which combinations to test are in dire need of further development. The NIH as well as the Bender group have recently explored experimental and computational approaches in modeling combination screening data with success in the areas of malaria and cancer (supported, among others, by an ERC Starting Grant to Dr Bender), also in prospective experimental validations. The current project aims to develop the existing work further, combining the modeling expertise of Dr Guha at the NIH and Dr Bender in Cambridge, and experimental efforts of Dr Eastman at the NIH in order to improve prediction performance, the understanding of biological factors that drive drug synergy, and to move towards therapeutically useful models as much as possible, in particular in the areas of different cancers as well as malaria.

National Eye Institute (NEI)

NIH Mentor: Dr. Kapil Bharti (NEI)
UK Mentor:
University:
Project: Translation research on degenerative eye diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

NIH Mentor: Dr. Herb Geller (NHLBI)
UK Mentor: Prof. Keith Martin
University: Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Ophthalmology)
Project: The project will develop new methods to stimulate axon regeneration from the retina to the brain. The first method will be based on expressing integrins and integrin activators in ganglion cells, which has been dramatically successful in the spinal cord. The second method will be to activate signalling via phosphatidylinositols to stimulate axonal transport and motility. The project will also examine guidance of regenerating axons. Co-supervised by Professors James Fawcett and Keith Martin.

NIH mentor: Dr. Antonina Roll-Mecak (NHLBI / NINDS)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Mechanistic dissection of tubulin posttranslational modifications in health and disease.

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

NIH mentor: Dr. Philip Shaw (NHGRI)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Interplay between genes and the environment in shaping the development of brain and behavior.

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

 

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

NIH Mentor: Dr. Clif Barry (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Chris Abell
University: Cambridge, Department of Chemistry
Project: Mycobacterium tuberculosis to provide chemical validation of a target priot to therapeutic development.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Sonja Best (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Yorgo Modis
University: Cambridge, Department of Medicine
Project:The molecular basis of gene silencing by KAP1/TRIM28

Transcription of endogenous retroelements or other viral sequences integrated into the genome must be tightly controlled to avoid expression of harmful viral proteins. Transcriptional silencing is regulated by an epigenetic code of histone modifications. The overall goal of this project is to understand how repressive epigenetic marks are applied to retroelements. More specifically, we will examine how recruitment of KAP1/TRIM28 by KRAB domain-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) results in histone H3 methylation by SETDB1, and how this process is regulated. Through a combination of structural, biophysical and cell biological approaches, this work will allow us to build a mechanistic model of how the KAP1 complex establishes and maintains its gene silencing activity.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Raphaela Goldbach-Mansky (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Clare Bryant
University: Cambridge, Department of Veterinary Medicine
Project: How do disease-inducing mutations affect inflammasome formation and activation?

NIH Mentor: Dr. Steve Holland (NIAID) / Dr. Adriana Marques (NIAID)
UK Mentor:
University:
Project: Host response in Lyme disease: investigating factors associated with local control, dissemination and persistence.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Michael Lenardo (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Ken Smith
University: Cambridge, Department of Medicine
Project:Resolving the uncertainty in genetic diagnosis for patients with primary immunodeficiency.

We have the largest world-wide collection of patients suffering from rare-inherited immunodeficiency that have been whole-genome sequenced (1500+ cases). Using established analytical expertise the candidate will use novel methods to interrogate and filter potential genetic mutations, we will identify novel candidate genetic loci in patients grouped by disease phenotype or familial relationship. Candidate genetic loci will be investigated using CRISPR-editing of patient derived material (lymphoblastoid, fibroblast and iPS cell lines). Confirmatory studies at mRNA, protein and functional level will be carried out to validate the link between variant and disease.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Susan Pierce (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Patrick Maxwell
University: Cambridge, Institute for Medical Research
Project:The role of the hypoxia pathway in the survival of long-lived plasma cells and memory B- cells.

Antibody production is an essential arm of the adaptive immune system providing both immediate and long-term protection against infection.
Long-lived plasma cells reside in specialised niches in the bone marrow and are responsible for secreting high antibody titres, providing protection following exposure to antigen or immunisation. The bone marrow is a hypoxic environment suggesting that the hypoxia pathway may be essential for the proliferation, function and survival of plasma cells. However, the role of the hypoxia pathway in plasma cells is unknown. This translational project will utilise transgenic mouse models, human tissues, imaging and sequencing techniques to address how hypoxia influences plasma cells. We expect the project to provide new insight into antibody responses that will have important implications in a range of immunological settings including vaccine response, transplant rejection, autoimmunity and cancer.

NIH mentor: Dr. Jinfang (Jeff) Zhu (NIAID)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Understanding of the mechanisms through which CD4 T helper cells and innate lyphoid cells acquire their specific protective/tissue damaging effects.

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

NIH Mentor: Dr. Tamas Balla (NICHD)
UK Mentor: Prof. Colin W Taylor
University: Cambridge, Department of Pharmacology
Project: Application of high-resolution optical microscopy and novel probes to analyses of spatially organized calcium and phospholipid signalling pathways.

NIH mentor: Dr. Stephen Kaler (NICHD)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Identifying genetic causes of neurometabolic disorders and develop gene therapy treatments for these diseases

NIH Mentor: Dr. Karel Pacak (NICHD)
UK Mentor: Prof. Eamonn Maher
University: Cambridge, Department of Medical Genetics
Project:Undertake genomic and epigenomic studies into the mechanisms of tumourigenesis in individuals with inherited predisposition to neuroendocrine tumour syndromes (phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma) associated with renal cell carcinoma to study their commonalities as well as differences. Such discoveries can lead to understanding of developmental and other mechanisms in tumours related to the same syndrome but behaving in a different way and occurring in different tissue of origin. Such data can be paramount to study novel therapeutic approaches for these tumors based on the discovery on novel tumour-specific as well as tumour-non-specific targets.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Gisela Storz (NICHD)
UK Mentor: Prof. Ben Luisi
University: Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry
Project: The project will use X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, molecular genetics and cellular microscopy to explore how regulatory RNA is used to modulate gene expression with speed and precision in diverse bacteria.

NIH mentor: Dr. Brant Weinstein (NICHD)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Organogenesis of the Zebrafish Vasculature.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

NIH mentor: Dr. Jeffrey Kopp (NIDDK)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Studying the function of APOL1 genetic variants using transgenic mice and cell culture models.

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

NIH mentor: Dr. Victor Pike (NIMH)
UK mentor: Prof. Franklin Aigbirhio (Cambridge); Prof. Véronique Gouverneur (Oxford)
University: Cambridge & Oxford
Project: Invent and implement new radioactive probes for imaging specific molecular targets in animal and human brain with positron emission tomography.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

NIH mentor: Dr. Bibi Bielekova (NINDS)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Development of cell-specific or process-specific biomarkers for CNS diseases.

NIH mentor: Dr. Kurt Fischbeck (NINDS)
UK mentor: Prof. Kevin Talbot and Prof. Dame Kay Davies
University: Oxford
Project: Understand the disease mechanism and potential treatments of the polyglutamine expansion diseases that include Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy.

NIH mentor: Dr. Avindra Nath (NINDS)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Determining the role of endogenous retroviruses in the pathophysiology of neurological diseases.

NIH mentor: Dr. Daniel Reich (NINDS)
UK mentor:
Prof. Robin Franklin
University:
Cambridge
Project:
Examine the dynamics of oligodendrocyte lineage cells in murine and primate models of multiple sclerosis using a combination of imaging, histopathological, and molecular techniques.

NIH mentor: Dr. Antonina Roll-Mecak (NINDS / NHLBI)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Mechanistic dissection of tubulin posttranslational modifications in health and disease.

NIH mentor: Dr. Kareem Zaghloul (NINDS)
UK mentor:
University:
Project: Exploring the neural correlates of cognitive function in humans through neurosurgery

Oxford

NIH mentor: Dr. Amy Berrington de Gonzalez (NCI)
UK mentor: Prof. Jane Green
University: Oxford
Project: Diet and brain tumors in the UK million women study and the US NIH-AARP diet and health study.

NIH mentor: Dr. Kurt Fischbeck (NINDS)
UK mentor: Prof. Kevin Talbot and Prof. Dame Kay Davies
University: Oxford
Project: Understand the disease mechanism and potential treatments of the polyglutamine expansion diseases that include Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy.

NIH mentor: Dr. Victor Pike (NIMH)
UK mentor: Prof. Véronique Gouverneur (Oxford)
University: Oxford
Project: Invent and implement new radioactive probes for imaging specific molecular targets in animal and human brain with positron emission tomography.

Cambridge

NIH Mentor: Dr. Victor Pike (NIMH)
UK Mentor: Prof. Frank Aigbirhio
University: Cambridge, Department of Neuroscience
Project: Invent and implement new radioactive probes for imaging specific molecular targets in animal and human brain with positron emission tomography.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Clif Barry (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Chris Abell
University: Cambridge, Department of Chemistry
Project: Mycobacterium tuberculosis to provide chemical validation of a target priot to therapeutic development.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Scott Auerbach, Dr. Nicole Kleinstreuer, Dr. Nisha Sipes (NIEHS)
UK Mentor: Dr. Andreas Bender
University: Cambridge, Department of Chemistry, Molecular Informatics Centre
Project: Combined Computational-Experimental Approaches to Predict Acute Systemic Toxicity

Acute systemic toxicity is currently determined via oral, dermal and inhalation routes in rat and rabbits; however, given the large number of animals needed for these tests there is a large incentive to identify alternative approaches to characterizing acute toxicity. In the proposed project we plan to integrate the significant amount of data made available from efforts at NIEHS through Tox21 and CBI data extraction, with the novel modeling methods in Cambridge (i.e., conformal prediction). The end goal of this project will be the development of models that can provide semiquantitative forecasts of acute systemic toxicity, in line with EPA and DHS requirements. In addition to individual chemicals we plan to apply our approach to compound mixtures, an area of considerable practical relevance that has historically been a notable challenge for toxicity forecasting. This project combines the strengths and shared goals of both parties, which is to reduce the number of animal experiments required for regulatory testing. We anticipate that a collaborative approach which brings together researchers with distinct expertise will greatly increase likelihood of the success of the project.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Rajarshi Guha (NCATS)
UK Mentor: Dr. Andreas Bender
University: Cambridge, Department of Chemistry, Molecular Informatics Centre
Project: Predicting the Efficacy of Drug Combination Therapy in Cancer and Malaria

Given the difficulty of finding novel and efficacious single compound treatments the combination of existing drugs is currently seen as a viable alternative strategy; however, due to combinatorial explosion predictive modeling methods of which combinations to test are in dire need of further development. The NIH as well as the Bender group have recently explored experimental and computational approaches in modeling combination screening data with success in the areas of malaria and cancer (supported, among others, by an ERC Starting Grant to Dr Bender), also in prospective experimental validations. The current project aims to develop the existing work further, combining the modeling expertise of Dr Guha at the NIH and Dr Bender in Cambridge, and experimental efforts of Dr Eastman at the NIH in order to improve prediction performance, the understanding of biological factors that drive drug synergy, and to move towards therapeutically useful models as much as possible, in particular in the areas of different cancers as well as malaria.

NIH Mentor: Multiple potential NIH collaborators
UK Mentor: Dr. Gonçalo Bernardes
University: Cambridge, Department of Chemistry
Project: We have invented a new way to deliver carbon monoxide (CO) to specific tissues using artificial metalloproteins (protein=targeting vehichel, peptide, protein, antibody). We would like to explore further the roles of CO as an immunodulator (we have evidence for this) in cancer progression and inflammatory diseases such as RA.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Raphaela Goldbach-Mansky (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Clare Bryant
University: Cambridge, Department of Veterinary Medicine
Project: How do disease-inducing mutations affect inflammasome formation and activation?

NIH Mentor: Multiple potential NIH collaborators
UK Mentor: Prof. Edwin Chilvers
University: Cambridge, Department of Medicine
Project: Using real-time deformability cytometry (RT-DC) to define the mechanical properties of human neutrophils in health and disease (Otto O et al, Nat Methods 2015; 12:199) (collaborative project with Professor W Ouwehand, NHS Blood and Transplant and The Sanger Institute)

NIH mentor: Multiple potential NIH collaborators
UK mentor:
Dr. Jasmin Fisher
University:
Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry
Project:
In silico mechanistic models to identify novel cancer therapies.

NIH mentor: Dr. Christian Abnet (NCI/DCEG)
UK mentor:
Prof. Rebecca Fitzgerald
University:
Cambridge, MRC Cancer Unit
Project:
Genetics of squamous cell carcinoma - identifying high risk groups

NIH mentor: Dr. Daniel Reich (NINDS)
UK mentor:
Prof. Robin Franklin
University:
Cambridge
Project:
Examine the dynamics of oligodendrocyte lineage cells in murine and primate models of multiple sclerosis using a combination of imaging, histopathological, and molecular techniques.

NIH mentor: Dr. Genoveffa (Veffa) Franchini (NCI/CCR)
UK mentor:
Prof. Jonathan L Heeney
University:
Cambridge, Department of Veterinary Medicine
Project:
Proposed projects; We have several lines of research that accommodate excellent PhD candidates. These revolve around the theme of RNA viral pathogens, antibodies/B-cell responses and immunodefifiencies.The 1st involves understanding Immune Correlates of protective immunity, specifically which types of B-cell response and their fine specificities are important for protection against specific RNA viral pathogens (RNA viruses from HIV, HCV to Ebola) how B-cell responses to correlate with protection by vaccines to specific pathogens. The 2nd project involves using broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to develop improved and novel vaccines against notoriously variable viruses. The 3rd project involves understanding how the resident virome in primary, acquired or induced immunodeficies leads to chronic immune activation and poor prognosis, with an emphasis on mucosal immunity.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Gisela Storz (NICHD)
UK Mentor: Prof. Ben Luisi
University: Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry
Project: The project will use X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, molecular genetics and cellular microscopy to explore how regulatory RNA is used to modulate gene expression with speed and precision in diverse bacteria.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Karel Pacak (NICHD)
UK Mentor: Prof. Eamonn Maher
University: Cambridge, Department of Medical Genetics
Project:Undertake genomic and epigenomic studies into the mechanisms of tumourigenesis in individuals with inherited predisposition to neuroendocrine tumour syndromes (phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma) associated with renal cell carcinoma to study their commonalities as well as differences. Such discoveries can lead to understanding of developmental and other mechanisms in tumours related to the same syndrome but behaving in a different way and occurring in different tissue of origin. Such data can be paramount to study novel therapeutic approaches for these tumors based on the discovery on novel tumour-specific as well as tumour-non-specific targets.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Herb Geller (NHLBI)
UK Mentor: Prof. Keith Martin
University: Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Ophthalmology)
Project: The project will develop new methods to stimulate axon regeneration from the retina to the brain. The first method will be based on expressing integrins and integrin activators in ganglion cells, which has been dramatically successful in the spinal cord. The second method will be to activate signalling via phosphatidylinositols to stimulate axonal transport and motility. The project will also examine guidance of regenerating axons. Co-supervised by Professors James Fawcett and Keith Martin.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Susan Pierce (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Patrick Maxwell
University: Cambridge, Institute for Medical Research
Project:The role of the hypoxia pathway in the survival of long-lived plasma cells and memory B- cells.

Antibody production is an essential arm of the adaptive immune system providing both immediate and long-term protection against infection.
Long-lived plasma cells reside in specialised niches in the bone marrow and are responsible for secreting high antibody titres, providing protection following exposure to antigen or immunisation. The bone marrow is a hypoxic environment suggesting that the hypoxia pathway may be essential for the proliferation, function and survival of plasma cells. However, the role of the hypoxia pathway in plasma cells is unknown. This translational project will utilise transgenic mouse models, human tissues, imaging and sequencing techniques to address how hypoxia influences plasma cells. We expect the project to provide new insight into antibody responses that will have important implications in a range of immunological settings including vaccine response, transplant rejection, autoimmunity and cancer.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Sonja Best (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Yorgo Modis
University: Cambridge, Department of Medicine
Project:The molecular basis of gene silencing by KAP1/TRIM28

Transcription of endogenous retroelements or other viral sequences integrated into the genome must be tightly controlled to avoid expression of harmful viral proteins. Transcriptional silencing is regulated by an epigenetic code of histone modifications. The overall goal of this project is to understand how repressive epigenetic marks are applied to retroelements. More specifically, we will examine how recruitment of KAP1/TRIM28 by KRAB domain-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) results in histone H3 methylation by SETDB1, and how this process is regulated. Through a combination of structural, biophysical and cell biological approaches, this work will allow us to build a mechanistic model of how the KAP1 complex establishes and maintains its gene silencing activity.

NIH Mentor: Multiple potential NIH collaborators
UK Mentor: Dr. Timothy O'Leary
University: Cambridge, Department of Engineering
Project: Models of ion channel regulation in single cells and small circuits; Modelling robust neuromodulation; Regulation and control of neural activity and circuit dynamics

NIH Mentor: Dr. Montserrat Garcia-Closas (NCI)
UK Mentor: Prof. Paul Pharoah
University: Cambridge, Department of Oncology and Public Health and Primary Care
Project: Molecular and somatic genetic profiling of breast tumors in relation to etiology and survival in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)

NIH Mentor: Multiple potential NIH collaborators
UK Mentor: Dr. Yan Yan Shery Huang
University: Cambridge, Department of Engineering
Project: Establish and implement a glioblastoma-on-a-chip model to study the effect of microenvironments on the tumor progression

NIH Mentor: Dr. Michael Lenardo (NIAID)
UK Mentor: Prof. Ken Smith
University: Cambridge, Department of Medicine
Project:Resolving the uncertainty in genetic diagnosis for patients with primary immunodeficiency.

We have the largest world-wide collection of patients suffering from rare-inherited immunodeficiency that have been whole-genome sequenced (1500+ cases). Using established analytical expertise the candidate will use novel methods to interrogate and filter potential genetic mutations, we will identify novel candidate genetic loci in patients grouped by disease phenotype or familial relationship. Candidate genetic loci will be investigated using CRISPR-editing of patient derived material (lymphoblastoid, fibroblast and iPS cell lines). Confirmatory studies at mRNA, protein and functional level will be carried out to validate the link between variant and disease.

NIH Mentor: Dr. Tamas Balla (NICHD)
UK Mentor: Prof. Colin W Taylor
University: Cambridge, Department of Pharmacology
Project: Application of high-resolution optical microscopy and novel probes to analyses of spatially organized calcium and phospholipid signalling pathways.

NIH Mentor: Multiple potential NIH collaborators
UK Mentor: Dr. Fiona Walter
University: Cambridge, Department of Public Health & Primary Care
Project: Novel approaches to cancer diagnostics in primary care

 


For more general information regarding research and graduate programs please visit:

 

This Page Last Reviewed on February 22, 2017